Book reviews · personal

Revisiting Old Favorites: Matilda by Roald Dahl

matilda roald dahl

2018 is the year I started giving my local library more love. And it’s been amazing. One of the greatest things about the library is that they allow me to revisit my old favorites more easily: books that I once read but (no longer) have in my possession. I don’t always want to spend money on these books because I know the story so well, but I would like to reread them. The library is the perfect solution.

Matilda by Roald Dahl is such a book. Just like so many other children, I loved this book when I was younger. I think Matilda might be one of the first characters I related to. I was also a child that loved reading, did incredibly well in school compared to my peers and thus stood out. Although my classmates weren’t as nice to me as they were too Matilda, it was comforting to know that characters like hers existed and I wasn’t the odd one out. (It’s funny how back then being ‘different’ meant something negative, but now I  love it).

There is another reason why I love Matilda so much. It is one of the very few children’s books I’ve read that deals with abuse well. I’ve read some negative reviews from people saying that kids shouldn’t read about this, and that this book makes it sound like almost all adults are terrible. I disagree. I think Matilda is a great introduction into the tough and often unfair world of adulthood. Although the adults in this book – like Matilda’s parents and Ms. Trunchbull – are completely unrealistic and over the top, the problems that Matilda has to deal with are very real. Emotional neglect and adults that enjoy bullying very much exist, and this book shows us that Matilda is much stronger than them.

Above all, this book values kindness more than anything. Matilda and Miss Honey end up together in the end, which is heartwarming. It’s just one of those books that always puts a smile on my face. And even now, about fifteen years after I first read it, I still love Matilda.

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Bookish posts

Unpopular Bookish Opinions

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Anything that goes against the grain immediately grabs my attention; maybe that’s why I love listening to unpopular opinions so much. Sharing them has been a thing on Twitter lately, and it inspired me to write this post!

Katniss should’ve ended up alone
People are either Team Peeta or Team Gale.. and here I am sitting quietly, by myself, in the ”Katniss should’ve ended up alone” team. Before you crucify me, let me explain. Katniss never made a choice. People were pulling at her from different angles, and she was just falling for the person that happened to be right in front of her. I never felt like she was one hundred percent going for either or. Ending up alone would have fitted her independent personality.

Floppy mass marker paperbacks are the best
I know a lot of people don’t like these, but I LOVE a good floppy mass market paperback. Especially the really thick ones that look like bricks. There is something about them that makes them so lovely to read and go through. But then again I don’t mind breaking the spines of my books, so I think that helps a lot.

Highlighting books and dog-earing them is okay
I actually talked about this before, but I wanted to mention it here because I do feel like most people disagree with me here. I love annotating my books, and I love when they look all beat up. It just makes my books look so loved. Going back to books that I annotated ages ago makes me feel nostalgic inside, in the same way that looking at an old journal might do.

Rainbow shelves stress me out
Writing this, I realise that this definitely fits with my previous point. Maybe I’m just not neat enough, but rainbow shelves kind of weird me out. I feel like it’s not how a bookshelf is ”supposed” to look. I like the messy book bookshelves have, and it’s how I prefer mine. But hey, to each their own.  Continue reading “Unpopular Bookish Opinions”

Book reviews · Bookish posts

What I’ve Been Reading Lately

Now that I have started a new degree that’s eating up all my time, my blog has been a little more quiet. And so has my reading.. However, I still love talking about books with you guys, and instead of jumping right into the long, long list of reviews I still need to post, I thought I’d combine them together here to catch up. 🙂

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The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R. Pan

An emotional rollercoaster, that how I would describe this book. I’m only just dabbling into the genre of magical realism, but this was the first novel I’ve ever read that incorporated it in a way that I loved. It was beautiful, gut-wrenching, realistic and cute. Definitely worth the hype.


Little Monsters by Kara Thomas
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I recently read, reviewed and LOVED The Cheerleaders by Kara Thomas. After that, I knew I had to read more of her work. This book had the same suspense and awesome true crime aspects as her other works, but I found this book to be a little more predictable – I predicted who did it way before the actual reveal happened. Still a solid 4 star read though.

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This Savage Song by V.E. Schwab
One of my favorite series this year was the Shades of magic series by V.E. Schwab. So obviously I was excited to read more of her works. The premise of this book really intrigued me, it’s about a world in which monsters are created from crimes and acts of violence, like massacres and murders. But the story left a lot to be desired, especially regarding the world building. So much was never explained, and for me it really took away from the story.

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The Rift: A New Africa Breaks Free by Alex Perry
Africa is a continent that’s long been misunderstood – and abused -by outsiders. Correspondent Alex Perry traveled the continent for most of a decade, meeting with entrepreneurs and warlords, professors and cocaine smugglers, presidents and jihadis. I loved how he gave them a platform in this book while also giving the reader historical context as to why certain situations exist in the first place. A book that taught me a lot, but especially to spend more time listening to stories from locals.

As I mentioned at the beginning of this post, I really want to catch up with you guys! Have you read any of these books? If not, what have YOU been reading lately?

Bookish posts

14 Great YA Books You Should Add To your TBR Right Now

It’s no secret I’ve been critical of YA fiction in the past. I hate a lot of tropes, have a love for very specific books.. I could go on. I don’t want this space to be negative, nor do I want to be the girl to trash books on the internet. It’s just not what I’m about.

So today I want to share with you a long awaited list of YA books that I DO in fact, enjoyed reading. I read a wide variety of books, so this list will also consist of a wide variety of books. What they will have in common is that, of course, they’re catered towards a YA audience, but they’re also actually good.

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14. Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder
Often cited as the best YA introduction to Western Philosophy, Sophie’s World is one of those books that holds a special place in my heart. The first half is a bit slow plot-wise, but don’t let it catch of you off guard! When I first read this, I read the entire second portion of the book is less than a day.

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13. I’ll Give You The Sun by Jandy NelsonA book that will eave you fuzzy and heartbroken at the same time. I’ll Give You The Sun tells the story of two twin siblings and the loss of their mother. This book is absolutely beautiful, in both storyline and writing style.

 

Cinder
12, 11, 10 and 9. The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer
The four books that make up The Lunar Chronicles are absolutely phenomenal. This is a widely known series, but if you haven’t read them yet, just know that you absolutely should! Cinder, Scarlett, Cress and Winter are all names of characters based on various fairytales, as their names suggest. Their lives end up winding together as their dystopian future is being threatened by a plague.

The Hate U Give

8. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Read this book and then watch the movie (which comes out in less than two months!),pretty please. You’ve probably heard of this one also (if you haven’t, HOW?!) so you know that it tells and important story about racism and police brutality in the United States. Iwasn’t the biggest fan of the writing style here, but the actual story itself is very well done and important.

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7, 6 and 5. The Shades of Magic series bij V.E. Schwab
I know technically this book is considered ”adult” but it definitely reads more YA to me. The main characters are all fairly young (19 and 21 if I’m not mistaken) and the books are very accessible in both the storyline and the writing style. Definitely check this out if you love a good fantasy!

 

4. Salt To The Sea by Ruta SepetysSchermafbeelding 2018-08-27 om 18.51.29.png
This book is based on true events, and I always find it hard to review those. This novel is based on a true story from the Second World War. When the German ship the Wilhelm Gustloff was sunk in port in early 1945 it had over 9000 civilian refugees, including children, on board. Nearly all were drowned. Although this book is definitely not perfect, it was a quick read and it taught me a lot about this specific moment in history. Continue reading “14 Great YA Books You Should Add To your TBR Right Now”

Book reviews

Book Review: The Reason You’re Alive by Matthew Quick

Reason youre alive book review matthew Quick

There’s this ongoing debate about unlikeable characters: Should you rate a book lower if it has an unlikeable or problematic character? Even if that was actually the point of the book in the first place?

This is something I still struggle with myself. The Reason You’re Alive by Matthew Quick is a book with an unlikeable character like that. And while I don’t want to rate a book lower only because the MC isn’t a perfect person, his words an actions did have an affect on my enjoyment of the book. And if I enjoyed a book less, that means I should give it a lower rating, right? Otherwise I’m just giving a book a rating that doesn’t make sense for me.

”Only the good die young, and I’ve lived nasty.” – David Granger, The Reason You’re Alive

Dilemma’s. Before I go off on an even longer tangent, let me tell you about the premise of book. In The Reason You’re Alive, we get to know David Granger. He’s a republican army veteran that loves guns and regularly craps on how ”politically correct” the current world is. I think most of us know someone like this, and most of us don’t really like spending time with them.

However, David has an eclectic group of friends who all tolerate him, including a gay couple and a Vietnamese woman. Reading this felt a little unrealistic to me. David has very liberal opinions at times, yet still votes against the interest of his diverse group of friends? How does that make sense? Continue reading “Book Review: The Reason You’re Alive by Matthew Quick”

Bookish posts

8 Specific Types of Young Adult Books That I Would Like To Read More Of

reading less YA

Do you ever read a book with very specific tropes and you just go ”give me more of that!” but it’s super hard, of not impossible, to find those books? This happens to me ALL. THE. TIME. I figured writing a blog post listing all my favorite too-specific-to-search-tropes and maybe, just maybe you’ll think of a book that you just KNOW I’ll love! If you do, please recommend it to me in the comment section down below. 

Books in which food somehow plays a huge role
I’m talking the type of book in which food is more than just fuel. I want it to SHINE. Food is often part of a culture, a time period or even a fantasy world, and too often to I feel like authors forget how much you can tell about a setting with food.

Books with female pirates
I’m sure they’re out there, but WHERE? I read about a female pirate in the Shades of Magic trilogy by V.E. Schwab, and I want more girly pirates now. I want to read more pirate stories anyway, why do I feel like this is a setting we don’t see that often in YA fiction?

Books with a library setting, or books about books in general
Take a drink every time I say ‘book’. But seriously, I love reading books about books, or books that have a library setting. Library settings are magical, and usually instantly make me love about about 64% more. 

Books with unlikeable main characters
Give me dark and twisty main characters. Give me main characters that make the wrong decision and push everyone away. But most of all, make me root for these people even though I shouldn’t. 

(Realistic) books set in law school
Okay, I’m only including this here because I’m starting law school in about two weeks and I’m super excited about it. I’m currently reading and watching anything law school related that I can get my hands on. Yes.. I’m that much of a geek. But I would like the books to be somewhat realistic, because I bet law school isn’t as glamorous as some books and films make it out to be, and I don’t want to set myself up for failure.  Continue reading “8 Specific Types of Young Adult Books That I Would Like To Read More Of”

Bookish posts

The Pros and Cons of Reviewing ARCs

books and rants dalindcy

After a bunch of people loved my post about the pros and cons of being a mood reader, I decided to have this format make a comeback, and this time we’re talking ARCs!

For those of you who stumbled on this post and have no idea what an ARC is: this acronym stands for Advanced Reader Copy, and it’s a version of a book that is often released to a very small amount of people before the actual release date. These people, often book bloggers or BookTubers, will then review the book beforehand and (hopefully) create some hype! ARCs are also sometimes given out to get feedback from readers about the actual content of the book. Think pace, characters, writing style..

ARCs usually still have some typos and other mistakes in them (it’s almost never the final copy!) and most of the times the final cover isn’t there either. I’ve been ARC reviewing for a long time. If you want to send me an ARC, please check out my review policy.

Pros of reviewing ARCs

  • You get to read the book before anyone else! Or.. almost anyone else. If you’re excited about a book, those few weeks or months make all the difference. If it’s a very anticipated release and you’re first with a review on your platform of choice, you’ll probably reach a bigger audience too.
  • Your reading makes a difference. I don’t know if this is a pro for anyone else.. but I love this about ARC reading. It just feels like my feedback and review is valued.
  • You get books in your mailbox. Christmas in July! Or.. August actually. It’s so much fun to get books in your mailbox. Sometimes I get sent books unsolicited, and although I prefer it if people let me know that they’re going to send me a book, it’s still nice to open up a little present!

Continue reading “The Pros and Cons of Reviewing ARCs”